Contreras Speaks on Genomic Data Sharing Policy at IASC Panel

Jorge Contreras, associate professor at the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law, spoke on May 26 at the International Association for the Study of the Commons (IASC) in Edmonton, Alberta, regarding NIH’s new Genomic Data Sharing policy, which went into effect this January. His contribution was part of a panel on the production, dissemination […]

Contreras to Present Data-Sharing Paper at Duke Law School

Jorge Contreras, Associate Professor at the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law, will be presenting his paper “Multi-Commons and Meta-Commons in the New Data Sharing Universe” on Thursday, April 30, 2015, at the International IP Roundtable held at Duke Law School.  The paper, co-authored with Jerry Reichman at Duke Law School, explores new models […]

Contreras to Moderate IP Panel at Northwestern University Roundtable

On April 10, 2015, Jorge Contreras, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law, will moderate a panel discussion at the Third Annual Searle Center Research Roundtable on Innovation Economics – Patent and Technology Standard Data Sets at Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago. Contreras’s panel will focus on […]

Contreras Publishes Article in CPI Antitrust Chronicle on Patent Royalty Stacking

Jorge Contreras, Associate Professor at the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law, published an article in the most recent CPI Antitrust Chronicle discussing the phenomenon of patent royalty “stacking” (which occurs when hundreds or thousands of patents cover the same product).  He outlines the risks posed by stacking to consumers and market participants, and critiques […]

Property Rules and Liability Rules for Genetic Data

By Jorge L. Contreras for BioLawToday.org, originally posted on Balkin.com.  For the Innovation Law Beyond IP 2 conference, March 28-29 at Yale Law School In 2009, the Texas Department of Health agreed to destroy a research biobank containing approximately 5.3 million infant blood samples. The samples, stored on index cards as dried blood spots, were collected over an […]

Contreras Presents Recent Work on Patent Pledges in D.C.

On February 6, 2015, Jorge Contreras, Associate Professor at the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law, presented his recent work on Patent Pledges at the annual Works in Progress in Intellectual Property (WIPIP) conference in Washington, DC. Recent pledges not to assert patents by companies including Tesla Motors, Toyota and Myriad Genetics represent […]

Contreras Speaks Out About Patents on Standards

Jorge Contreras, Associate Professor at the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law, has recently spoken out in favor of controversial changes to the patent policy of a major international standards organization.  The IEEE, which created the ubiquitous Wi-Fi standards for wireless networking, has recently approved several significant modifications to its intellectual property policy. […]

Contreras Awarded URC Faculty Research Grant

Jorge Contreras, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law, has been awarded a URC Faculty Research Grant to conduct interviews and other research for a book tracing the development of the Myriad Genetics “gene patenting” case.  The case, which was brought by the ACLU against local biotech firm […]

Contreras Publishes Article Critiquing NIH Policy on Genomic Data Sharing

January 24, 2015 — Jorge Contreras, Associate Professor at the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law,  has published an article in the journal Trends in Genetics analyzing and critiquing the new National Institutes of Health (NIH) policy on Genomic Data Sharing (GDS).  The policy, which goes into effect this month, covers all forms of genetic data […]

Contreras Interviewed on Research Funding at Universities

Professor Jorge Contreras was interviewed in a January 10 Salt Lake Tribune article, “U. of Utah research increasingly runs on corporate dollars.” Contreras comments on the impact of the Bayh-Dole Act, which made the intellectual property developed by the faculty doing federally funded research the property of the universities. He also says that the increase […]