Downtown CLE: Dealing with Gridlock in Congress

Senate Democrats recently changed the filibuster rules on votes to confirm judicial and executive branch nominations.  Under the old rules, at least 60 votes were required to invoke cloture and cut off debate on nominations.  Under the new rules, however, the vote to end a filibuster and invoke cloture requires only 51 votes, so that […]

Teter, Dahl to Discuss Dealing with Gridlock in Congress at Downtown CLE, Feb. 10

On Monday, February 10, Michael Teter, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law, and Alex Dahl, a shareholder at Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck in Washington, DC, and former Senior Counsel to the Senate Judiciary Committee, will present a Downtown CLE on the causes and consequences of filibuster reform […]

Teter Weighs in on Broken Judicial Confirmation Process in Cato Institute Journal

In January 2014, Michael Teter, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law, contributed an essay, “ Senate Rules and Norms, Not the Size of the Federal Government, are to Blame for the Broken Judicial Confirmation Process,” to Cato Unbound, the Cato Institute’s monthly online magazine.  The title of […]

Cassell to Argue Victims’ Rights Case Before U.S. Supreme Court, Jan. 22

On January 22, 2014, Professor Paul Cassell of the University of Utah S.J. Quinney  College of Law, will argue before the United States Supreme Court in a case involving the restitution for victims of child pornography crimes. Cassell represents “Amy,” a victim of child pornography. The case involves a dispute over how to allocate the costs […]

NY Times Reports on Child Pornography Case Brought by Cassell and Teter

On December 2, The New York Times reported on a case brought by University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law Professors Paul Cassell and Michael Teter on behalf of “Amy,” a victim of child pornography. As reported in the story, in January the Supreme Court will consider how much the men who viewed the […]

Cassell, Teter File U.S. Supreme Court Brief on Behalf of Child Porn Victim

This week, Professors Paul Cassell and Michael Teter of the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law filed their brief for the Utah Appellate Clinic in the United States Supreme Court on behalf of Amy, a victim of child pornography. The brief was co-authored by James Marsh, an attorney with the Marsh Law Firm in White […]

Law Review Symposium: Governing the United States in 2020

S.J.Quinney College of Law, Sutherland Moot Courtroom The United States government seems to be in a continual state of dysfunction. Gridlock grips Congress, the Executive Branch fills in the void of congressional lawmaking by acting unilaterally, the judiciary struggles with whether and how to involve itself in this state of affairs, and the States and […]

Nov. 8 Law Review Symposium to Explore Practical Solutions to Governmental Dysfunction

The United States government seems to be in a continual state of dysfunction. Gridlock grips Congress, the Executive Branch fills in the void of congressional lawmaking by acting unilaterally, the judiciary struggles with whether and how to involve itself in this state of affairs, and the States and American people must live with the consequences. […]

Improving the Law, Past, Present, and Future: A Century and Counting of Engaged Scholarship

Join the College of Law in the Sutherland Moot Courtroom to learn about and salute the College of Law’s century of influential legal scholarship as service. This event is free and open to the public but registration is requested. 12:00- Lunch 12:15- Introduction 12:20- Keynote -A history of Utah Law Scholarship and the influence of […]

Teter Client Granted Parole in California

June 12, 2013— Yesterday, a panel of the California Board of Parole Hearings issued a decision granting parole to inmate Sara Kruzan. Michael Teter, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law, who has worked on Kruzan’s behalf since 2007 when he was an attorney at Perkins Coie, described […]