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Peterson writes Op-ed about HR10 bill’s impact on the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law Professor Christopher Peterson wrote an Op-Ed titled, Bill would gut financial consumer protections for The Salt Lake Tribune.

Schwartz research on startup investing highlighted in The Wall Street Journal

University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law Professor Jeff Schwartz’s forthcoming paper in the North Carolina Law Review was discussed in The Wall Street Journal in an article titled, “Startup Investing Can Be Lucrative for Mutual Funds. And Problematic.“

Schwartz article on mutual funds posted in Harvard Law Forum

University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law Professor Jeff Schwartz‘s article titled Should Mutual Funds Invest in Startups? was posted in the Harvard Law Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation. The post is based on the article he wrote for the North Carolina Law Review. Read the full article here »

American Banker magazine reports on Peterson study related to Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

American Banker magazine covered new research by University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law Professor Christopher L. Peterson in its latest edition. Four years after Congress created the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) as a tool to help the American public recover from scars left by the economic collapse of the Great Recession, Peterson evaluated […]

Peterson discusses payday lending with The Atlantic

S.J. Quinney College of Law Professor Chris Peterson was interviewed in the May 2016 issue of The Atlantic in a story titled, “Payday Lending: Will Anything Better Replace It? The practice is slowly being regulated out of existence. But it’s unclear where low-income Americans will find short-term loans instead.” The idea that interest rates should have […]

Baughman writes for The Conversation about financing terror using U.S. shell companies

S.J. Quinney College of Law Professor Shima Baradaran Baughman published a paper in The Conversation titled, “Panama Papers show how easy it is to finance terror using U.S. shell companies.” “… an American has no need to form a shell company in Panama because they can obtain one right here in the United States. And as my […]

Baughman comments on “Panama Papers” for NPR’s Marketplace, Fusion

S.J. Quinney College of Law Professor Shima Baradaran Baughman commented on the “panama papers” for NPR’s Marketplace and the website WSWS.org. The paper consists of a 11.5 million confidential documents from the Panamanian corporate service provider Mossack Fonseca that provide detailed information on more than 214,000 offshore companies Shima Baradaran Baughman, a law Professor University of […]

Schwartz Testifies at House Subcommittee about Conflict Minerals, is Quoted in Wall Street Journal

University of Utah law professor Jeff Schwartz testified in Washington D.C. this week, telling the House Financial Services Monetary Policy and Trade Subcommittee that the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010 —in which public companies are required to monitor their supply chain for minerals mined from regions controlled by militia groups in the Democratic Republic of the […]

Schwartz Quoted in The Wall Street Journal on Tracking Conflict Minerals

On August 3, 2015, S.J. Quinney College of Law Professor Jeff Schwartz was quoted in The Wall Street Journal in an article titled, “U.S. Firms Struggle to Trace ‘Conflict Minerals’” “The cost of doing a bad job isn’t much,” said Jeff Schwartz, professor of law at the University of Utah’s law school. “Companies can kind […]

Schwartz quoted in Wall Street Journal on Conflict Minerals

S.J. Quinney College of Law professor Jeff Schwartz was quoted in the May 19, 2015 edition of the Wall Street Journal in a story titled, “EU Readies for Vote on Conflict Minerals” “If the goal of the reports is to expose these companies that have problematic sourcing practices to the public, I would argue that […]